A reflection between junk & funk.

“She’s started dressing differently.”

Dress composed by Kristin Olson-Huddle using records, dufle bag, bed skirt, cassette tape.

I hadn’t noticed.  I was preoccupied, struggling to understand a wife married to Richard Gere being grossly unhappy.  The movie was Unfaithful (link below).     My movie companion went on to say, “She’s dressing more like a French woman.”  Ah!  A woman in love and feeling attractive equals French, not American, style.

Tell me what you think!  Do women dress for men? Do they dress for other women?  Or – do they dress consistent with their self image and / or mood? And do the French women have a certain Savoir faire?

A reader sent me a NY Times article.  I read it on the run, getting enough of the jest to be  disturbed.  Pause to imagine a middle aged woman with a home office confronted with what to wear to a business conference when her professional clothing wardrobe had been neglected for years.   As I recall she took us on her shopping experience before concluding  “who cares what potato sack this aging gal wears? I am no longer noticed.”

“Pooh,”  I thought.  Last summer dating rekindled my interest in dressing. Walking (the one exercise form French embrace, other than sex) in Portland had freed me of 17 menopausal pounds.  That dip also changed things and propelled me back to more fitted clothes, higher heels and girly stuff over a strictly functional wardrobe.  The biggest change in my style, however, was in my gait.   I got that swing back! Heels or not, I walked taller.

ReBrewed. Dress of used coffee filters collected by designer Adrienne Duckrow.

I seek a style that is comfortable with a little something to stand apart in a crowd. There is a line given to Maria Callas in Terrance McNally’s play Master Class that even my son at age six understood (he bestowed the advise on a NYC waiter during after-theatre dining).  “You don’t have a look.  Get one!”

Returning to PDX (Portland airport) at midnight recently I happened upon an exhibit called Junk to Funk.  I easily could have been happy wearing all but the window blind dress.  When wearing high heels it is nice to be able to take a load off your feet periodically and that dress wasn’t gonna let me though it did a great job of hiding ample hips!

This week, put on your Sunday clothes and stride down the street.  It’s a great feeling!

Always, Trix

Dress made of window mini blinds. Junk to Funk PDX exhibit.

http://www.filmsandtv.com/movies/dianelane.php#n37

http://blogs.fashionclub.com/my_weblog/2010/04/recycled-fashion-show-at-portland-airport-junk-to-funk.html


11 Responses to “A reflection between junk & funk.”

  • Diane Brown Says:

    Loved your post. Personally, I feel like clothes are much like geography. For me, I’m happy who I am, WHERE I am, and what I’m in; stylish or not.

  • Sean Says:

    I would hope that if a woman dresses in a way that pleases her, the right man would be pleased.

  • Cokie Says:

    I’ve always considered fashion a form of semiotics–we convey information about ourselves symbolically though our clothing choices. I no longer have the very tailored, professional wardrobe I once wore, because it no longer fits with my life, but I still think about and care about what I wear, even when it’s jeans and Birkenstocks. When I go to book fairs or auctions, the only professional situations when I need to dress up, I am very conscious of the image I want to convey. It is also a bit like putting on armor, gearing up for battle, protecting yourself behind the mask.

  • Scholarships for Single Mothers Says:

    I have spent a bit of time going through your posts, more than I should have but I must say, its worth it!

  • acuum cleaner Says:

    Hello, nice to come to your blog!

  • Taser For Sale Says:

    I love the way you write and also the theme on your blog. Did you code this yourself or was it done by a professional? I’m very very impressed.

  • James Jorrisch Says:

    You can definitely see your enthusiasm in the work you write. The world hopes for more passionate writers like you who aren?¯t afraid to say how they believe. Always go after your heart.

  • pet Says:

    I would like to thnkx for the efforts you have put in writing this blog. I am hoping the same high-grade blog post from you in the upcoming as well. In fact your creative writing abilities has inspired me to get my own blog now. Really the blogging is spreading its wings quickly. Your write up is a good example of it.

  • poodle problems Says:

    I genuinely like Richard Gere, it is a shame he is becoming older ! Anyways any one knows what his subsequent film will be ?

  • Armando Marasco Says:

    Cheers, I really enjoyed reading your blog, and it looks wonderful. If you get a chance you should check my website as well. I hope you have a good day!

Leave a Reply